Temenos Journal II

December 15, 2013

The Technology of Success

Success, as I’m using it here, is defined as the self-perception that you are reaching your potential for fulfillment in any given area of your life. Success is defined by what you believe about yourself.

Some people seem to attract success and others resist success by attracting bad luck… why is that?

I’m learning that there is indeed a technology for success. There are a variety of teachers and methods for this technology.

I’ve been studying pieces and parts of the technology of success all my life, but I was missing the glue that put all the pieces together.  A big turning point for me was sparked at my first Out of the Matrix weekend in February 2013. I went to 5 or 6 subsequent Out of the Matrix weekends and learned a lot more about the technology. Not only that, but I did the homework and started seeing some dramatic results.

More specific technology for success is taught in Kabbalah, and using the tools from both technologies has resulted in huge personal breakthroughs for me, which continue to unfold.

If you learn the technology, apply the technology, and stay connected to like-minded teachers and students of the technology, then you can’t not be successful!

There are other technologies as well, but I like these two the best.

Join the mailing list to be kept informed about future Out of the Matrix weekends and events:

 

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July 30, 2011

Confessions of a Recovering Angry Feminist

RosieRiveterYes, I admit I am a recovering angry feminist.

I still abhor the patriarchal values that perpetuate a fear-based society, where money buys power and bullies rule.

I still get livid when a woman or child is abused — physically, mentally, or spiritually.

But I have changed my thinking in one major way…

During the 70s and 80s I worked very hard to prove that I could make it in a man’s world. I worked my way up in a nontraditional job in a piping construction firm — from clerical worker to project manager — and learned to wear a hard hat and read a blueprint.

Then I went into my own business. First I went into publishing, which evolved into graphics and printing. I negotiated contracts, raised working capital, and had power lunches with bankers, lawyers, and CEOs. I became a successful, prominent business woman who was often profiled in the press as a role model and a leader.

A big part of my mission was to help pave the way for other aspiring business women. I was a charter member and active leader in the local Women Business Owners Association and I organized a roundtable discussion group of successful business women. We learned how to network and make things happen alongside the good ol’  boys of the Cleveland business community.

We were the women who learned to compete and win in the male-dominated competitive and greed-driven business world. We (or most of us) had become part of the system. Right around the time that George Bush Sr. dropped the first bomb on Iraq… I realized that I no longer wanted to be part of that system. I felt something like ashamed.

That moment of epiphany was the beginning of the decision to leave the business world and become the artist and writer that I was born to be. I did not like what I would have had to become in order to go to the next level of success in business. I did not like playing by the rules that were invented by men in suits. I announced my decision to my friends in my business women’s roundtable and I had their full support.

As I began the process of easing out of business, I gained a new appreciation for what men have been accomplishing for so many centuries. As I slowed down, the numbness caused by the continual onslaught of adrenalin began to subside, and I started to realize how bone-weary I was. I ached from head to toe. My brain was worn out.

I remember thinking, “Men can have this. Running a business is for the birds.” I reflected on all the giant things that men have accomplished… building the railroads, building the bridges, inventing commerce, etc. This is way too much work and you really do need broader shoulders than I have or want.

I just wanted out of the game. It did not feel like defeat, it felt like liberation.

I am still a feminist. That is, I will always work for equal rights for women and girls. Thankfully, there’s not nearly as much work to do now as there was when I was starting out in business. But I am no longer an angry feminist.

I feel compassion for men, not anger. My mission has changed from “making it in a man’s world” to “changing the way we look at the world.” I have many male friends who share the same vision. Men are not our enemy. They are our brothers. The enemy is the patriarchal system, created before our grandparents’ time. The enemy is corporate greed, that holds so many of our men (and women) hostage.

We allow ourselves to look the other way and become numb so that we can provide a certain expected lifestyle for our families. Well, that’s a short-sighted sell-out because we lose our integrity in the process. We lose our health, our peace of mind, our self-respect, and ultimately our souls.

We need to participate more as conscious citizens who can think for ourselves and make up our own minds, instead of coasting along like passive consumers, most of whom are also self-medicating themselves just to be able to withstand the insanity.

As citizens, we need to stay vigilant to keep informed about what the prevailing game is, and to know the rules. If we don’t like the game, we don’t have to play. We can help invent a new game where the object is not necessarily to win — the object is to keep the game going. We need to revisit the rules every so often, so that we can change the rules when they no longer serve our highest collective good.

Yes, the angry feminist has mellowed. Now I am a spiritual activist. I don’t think we can change the world… but I think we can change our hearts. And so my work is to reach peoples’ hearts through my music and my writing and my art. Yes, I believe we can change the world by changing our hearts, one heart at a time. This is about as feminist and feminine as you can get, I think.

 

Related: On the Strategy of the Dolphin

Related: On Spiritual Activism

June 5, 2011

What is a goddess?

What is a goddess?

(Just to clarify… of course this is a metaphorical question!)

Before I get into my definition of “goddess” (with a small “g”), I offer my personal view on the Goddess (with a capital “G”). Metaphorically, the Great Goddess is a co-creator with God. Together they form the One, the creative essence of all life.

For purposes of illustration, I will call God (as we know “him”) Father Sky, and I will call the Great Goddess Mother Earth. Many, many thousands of years ago the Earth Goddess was worshiped and honored. Ultimately, the world view has become unbalanced, and the Earth Goddess has been put aside and hidden from our collective psyche. As we are aware, the lopsided view of the Sky God became an excuse for raping the earth, dominating women and weaker nations, and keeping the common people in ignorance by discouraging inner knowing and by punishing questioners of authority. Even the Sky God’s churches are phallic symbols reaching towards the sky.

The Earth Goddess rules intuition, while the Sky God rules the intellect. Together they create a balance. Yin and Yang. The Earth Goddess rules birth and creativity, while the Sky God rules structure and forward action. Together they create balance. The Earth Goddess rules water and earth, while the Sky God rules air and fire. Together they create balanced life.

If this sounds Native American…. it is. And more.

When I speak of a goddess with a small “g,” I speak of an earthly representative of the Great Goddess. I speak of someone who teaches us about the Great Goddess, just by virtue of their being. I don’t merely believe — I know that bringing back the essence of the Goddess is not only important — it is essential in turning around our world situation so that it is more… balanced.

Bringing attention to goddess-like women and their visions — through their work and their art — will help expand the consciousness of our society at large. It is an activity with consequence.

There is a lot of confusion and misunderstanding around the word goddess, when it is used to describe a mortal woman. Some people automatically think of sex goddesses designed by men — tall, buxom blondes in high heels and lingerie. Other people assume that goddesses must participate in pagan rituals. Other people think that the description is pompous or arrogant, and that the word “goddess” conjures up images of self-aggrandized women who put themselves up on pedestals, a notch above ordinary women. Don’t confuse a goddess with a diva, or a queen bee.

Charlie Sheen called his live-in porn starlets “goddesses”… whatever!

To help clarify the vision for all those who may want to help promote this concept of bringing back the feminine aspect of deity, here is what “goddess” means, when used to describe a mortal woman. No goddess-like woman (hereinafter referred to as goddess) is perfect, nor can every goddess demonstrate all of these qualities all of the time. We are, after all, mere mortals of our own imperfect imaginations. However, a goddess demonstrates most of these qualities most of the time:

A goddess invents her own life, and lives according to her own vision. This quality requires the companion qualities of imagination and courage.

A goddess is autonomous. She seeks no one’s approval, but listens to her own counsel. Perhaps she also listens to the Holy Spirit. She does not try to impress anyone. Her work speaks for itself. She never makes excuses and rarely offers explanations for her actions. She is not defensive for she is not threatened by what other people may think of her. She is the queen of her own life and this is reflected in her demeanor.

A goddess is passionate (not to be confused with manic). She has a palpable energy and enthusiasm that is contagious and beneficial to those around her. In esoteric terms, she raises the vibration in a group situation. She inspires others.

A goddess is continually learning and evolving.

A goddess is authentic. The mask she presents to the outside world is the same as her innermost heart. She has learned to express her emotions cleanly and healthily. What you see is what you get. A goddess knows her own truth. She does not impose her truth on others, but will share her wisdom when invited to.

A goddess takes care of herself. She does not expect others to take care of her. She treats herself as well as she would treat her best friend. She is compassionate and forgiving with herself and others. She gets enough rest and gives her body the right fuel — both in oxygen and in food and water. She also feeds and nurtures her soul. She knows what she needs.

A goddess is committed to universal healing and works towards peace and understanding — whether it is on a large scale or simply within her family and closest circle of friends. She contributes to cleaning up the environment–both in earthly terms and psychically– and teaches the next generation to do likewise.

A goddess sees her body (and the earth) as sacred, and is in tune with natural cycles. She is comfortable with her sexuality, and responsible in her choices.

A goddess has learned balance and patience. Flow and ebb. Waxing and waning. A goddess does not freak out during ebb or waning times. She uses it wisely for rest, reflection, and planning.

A goddess has learned to trust her intuition and inner knowing. She has learned to tap into this source at will, and can discern the difference between what is real and what is an illusion.

A goddess has learned to let go of the need to control the flow of the river. She has discovered the futility of trying too hard. She has learned to ride the wave and go with the flow, to ask for and accept help when required. She is flexible, fluid, and adaptable. She has given up the need to control or manipulate. She does not pout or whine when she does not get her way.

A goddess communicates her boundaries. She is gentle but firm when her boundaries are violated. She respects others’ boundaries. She asks for clarification when necessary.

A goddess recognizes and honors other goddesses and gods. She lends her support to the work of other god/desses. She does not feel competitive or threatened by other goddesses and understands that what is good for one is good for all, and that when one shines, the light benefits all. A goddess knows how to share and is generous of spirit, but she does not give more than what she can afford — emotionally, financially, physically, or energy-wise.

A goddess’s natural state is one of joy and gratitude. She is also at home with her shadow, and will honestly mourn her losses and explore her fears. She understands that everyone experiences pain — it is part of life on earth. Therefore she works through her own pain with courage and dignity, not trying to sidestep it, or numb it, but to get through it and learn from it.

A goddess is comfortable with death, and has learned to let go…. of relationships, concepts, and material possessions that are worn out, or that are no longer needed for our growth.

A goddess will sacrifice when necessary… for her children, for her elders, for her brothers and sisters. And she will kill when necessary, and understands the energy of Kali, and Mother Nature when she is fierce.

Mary, Holy Mother of Jesus–dearly beloved by Catholics and other devotees–is a perfect example of a Goddess with a capital G, because she represents the feminine aspect of God the Father. And a nun could also have goddess qualities, based on the above criteria.

We will never have true equality of the sexes until God is universally perceived as both male and female. Father and Mother.

This is the goddesspell according to Genie. 😉